Fitness

Glutes Workout Frequency: How many times a week to get results?

Glute muscles are one the modern era’s most popular workout focuses, mainly due to the societal pressure for glutes to look aesthetically pleasing, but just how often do you need to focus on them to achieve clear results?

Many people erroneously believe that you have to constantly be squatting in order to get results, but that isn’t necessarily the case.

What are the benefits?

There are plenty of reasons you should work out your glutes, with the main one being that that help keep your hips from getting too tight, and they also keep your pelvis stable.

Walking is a skill that is majorly aided by having strong glute muscles, and a lack of them can cause injury when you are mobile.

How can you maximise the impact of your efforts?

Adam Rosante is a professional personal trainer, and he explained that squats aren’t the only viable workout.

“I recommend emphasizing a heavy compound lift like the deadlift, hip thrust and squat two to three times per week,” Rosante explained in an interview with women’s health mag.

“Then round out your workout with two to three other glute-specific exercises to ensure you’re getting maximal muscle recruitment.”

Do off-days have an impact?

The days inbetween workouts are known as recovery days, and they are just as important for your glute strength.

They allow the muscles to recover after being used extensively, as well as adapt to the stimulation placed upon them.

The easiest way to explain this is by comparing it to trimming a house plant. If you take away enough leaves, the plant will be in a new shape, the plant will then regrow in accordance to the new shape.

Once you train your muscles to adapt to the strain of glute exercises, you will be able to do more meaningful workouts and thus earn more noticeable results.



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